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Malcolm X Murder Case Re-Investigated By DA's Office After Netflix Documentary Reveals New Evidence

Malcolm X

Thanks to the findings of a powerful Netflix documentary, the Manhattan District Attorney's office is reexamining the circumstances surrounding the 1965 murder of civil rights icon Malcolm X. In the six-part documentary called Who Killed Malcolm X?, activist Abdur-Rahman Muhammad argues that two of the men convicted for his murder couldn’t have been at the scene of the crime.
In part one of the documentary series, Muhammad begins his own investigation into the perplexing details surrounding Malcolm X's assassination. In part five, he pursues a controversial figure in Newark and examines the dangerous conditions involving police that ultimately led to Malcolm X's death. In part six, he uncovers more shocking details and evidence that caught the attention of the Manhattan DA's office.

The DA's office released a statement to the media saying: “District Attorney Vance has met with representatives from the Innocence Project and associated counsel regarding this matter. He has determined that the district attorney’s office will begin a preliminary review of the matter, which will inform the office regarding what further investigative steps may be undertaken. District Attorney Vance has assigned Senior Trial Counsel Peter Casolaro and Conviction Integrity Deputy Chief Charles King to lead this preliminary review.”

Malcolm X, who was born Malcolm Little, was shot and killed on February 21, 1965 while addressing an audience at the Audubon Ballroom in Washington Heights, New York City.

According to the Innocence Project, three members of the Nation of Islam were quickly arrested, and the three of them were convicted in 1966 and sentenced to life in prison. However, two of them — Muhammad Abdul Aziz and Khalil Islam — have always maintained their innocence. Sadly, Islam died back in 2009, but Aziz, now 81-years old, is still fighting to clear his name.